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Sinclair and Ruiz is a consultancy that creates integrated local, national and international marketing strategies


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Make Your Corporate Event a Success: Important Things to Consider When Planning an Event.

chairsCorporate events are one of the best tactics for putting a face to the name of a company. They allow organizations to connect with stakeholders in a personal way. Organizing a corporate event is not an easy task, but it does not have to be a pain either. An approach that focuses on the goals and planning needs of an event is key to success, whether you are a for-profit or a not for profit organization.

Here are some important considerations:

1.- Organizing and Planning.
Start with a project plan.  This is a to-do list of sorts that includes all the details about your event (before, during and after), which helps you to keep track of what needs to be done and who is responsible. Having a project plan does not mean that some things cannot change last minute, but it helps minimize the likelihood of challenges along the way.

2.- Goals.
Why is this event important? what are you trying to accomplish?
The event goals need to be very clear as communicating internal changes, launching new products or services or hosting a client appreciation event require different approaches.  It is very important to match what the event is attempting to communicate to the audience.

3.- Guests.
Make sure you have a clear target audience and a complete invitation list. Knowing your guest profile will help select the event format and venue. Be certain to send invitations at least 4 weeks in advance. Some people will confirm within a couple of days, some will take longer. However, the more advance time they have to schedule the event the better. But no matter what the situation is, be ready to do some follow up to keep your guest list up to date, and people interested. Also, keep in mind that some people will cancel, others will not show up and some may confirm last minute. 85% attendance is considered a good turnout, so factor that in to your logistical plans.

4.- Agenda and Format.
The agenda and event format need to include topics and opportunities for engagement that are relevant for your target audience, sponsors and V.I.P.s, in order to increase the likelihood of a good turnout.  Guests need to see the value the event offers or they will not attend. Also, be sure to avoid cramming too much into the agenda or important messaging will be lost.

5. Budget.
The budget will ultimately determine the size, format and location of the event. Obtaining several quotes and alternatives is helpful for building a budget with the best value and one that allows you to adapt to change if required. We recommend leaving some room for budget flexibility in case the opportunity arises to grow the event or an unforeseen situation arises (a required change in venue, for example).

6.- Venue.
Consider how many people you’d like to host and whether you will need to offer options for guest accommodation. Decide in advance whether you will require in-house catering, AV, decoration, liquor (and licensing), etc.  There are both inclusive and bare bones venue options, which have different pros and cons.

7.- Event Promotion.
Creating a positive buzz is important. Doing the right marketing for your event does not need to be super expensive as having the right strategy could go further than you think. Getting everybody involved by using social media, an email campaign and other advertising channels would help to generate the right buzz.

Marketing and communications strategies should start early and continue for a few weeks after the event in order to harness maximum impact.

8.- Team Collaboration.
Start by clarifying roles and deadlines. Schedule periodic meetings with your team to track the project plan progress. This will ensure everything is on time, budget and allow for adjustments as necessary.

If you are planning your first corporate event, remember to plan for every phase of the event in advance. This will ensure you stay organized and on top of every step of the way. An event is a project that requires detailed planning, teamwork and time dedication. If you do not have the capacity to follow each phase of the process, be sure to engage a professional to assist you so that your event investment is a success that provides generous results.

Contact Sinclair and Ruiz to learn more about how we can assist and help you to organize your next corporate event: info@sinclairandruiz.com

Mauricio Ruiz
Business Development

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Case Study: Promoting Trade in a Foreign Market

Promoting Trade in a Foreign Market

A business organization hired the Sinclair and Ruiz team to develop a communication strategy directed to potential trade partners for their members. S&R prepared the speech and presentation for the client’s event in New York.

The goal was to present  business opportunities and competitive advantages in an effective manner.

Shortly after the communication strategy launch, the client received inquiries from buyers looking to be connected to

the members of the organization who could fulfill their demand for products. Thus, the persuasive communication strategy generated concrete results.

Contact us info@sinclairandruiz.com to discuss how we can assist with the design and execution of effective strategies to open new markets and strengthen relationships with existing clients.


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Case Study: Fly and Buy Discovery Week Campaign

Fly and Buy

Sinclair and Ruiz promoted and coordinated a Discovery Week trip for a developer client who was seeking to promote awareness of their new rental and property management service; along with the remaining units available for sale in their latest condominium project.  The campaign was designed to convert leads obtained through different marketing efforts into clients.

Our team assisted with the design and implementation of the Discovery Week invitation and travel logistics. In order to engage with the leads, we designed a communications strategy to speak to the needs and emotional wishes of the prospective clients. We delivered this communication strategy via inbound marketing efforts, and providing easy contact with our branded representatives for interested parties. Upon reaching the desired level of engagement we maintained frequent communication with the prospective clients to answer questions, assist with travel arrangements, collect any required fees, and increase excitement about the Discovery Week.

To support our developer client, assisted in the design of the Discovery Week Schedule, in order to optimize the possibility of obtaining successful fly and buy sales results.

At the campaign conclusion, our client obtained a 52% conversion rate of prospective clients that paid their own flight and a discounted condominium rental rate to spend a week at the units available for rent. In addition to earning new rental clients, our client sold condominium units by the end of the Discovery Week, thus generating a short term return on their investment.

 

Contact Sinclair and Ruiz today at info@sinclairandruiz.com to learn how we can design and manage your successful Fly and Buy campaign. www.sinclairandruiz.com


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Points to Consider for Successful Press Trips

  • Objective. Determine what you want to achieve and the line of communication that you want to transmit. Target the media you want to invite accordingly and the numbers you can successfully host. Quantity of journalists should not be the objective.

 

  • Plan ahead.  Often press trips are planned with only a few weeks advance notice. The more time there is to plan and provide journalists with detailed information, the better.

 

  • Collaborate. The team in charge of logistics on the ground should work closely with the agency or persons coordinating with the media.

 

  • Individual media visits vs. group press trips.  Many journalists participate on group trips on a regular basis, and prefer group activities. Yet many others will not participate in group trips, period. Depending on the industry and size of the company/organization launching a PR strategy it is important to decide if individual media visits will be accommodated. If you host a group, make sure your itinerary is relevant to their interests. If you host an individual visit, get to know the journalist before he or she visits.

 

  • Downtime/ free time. Press trip hosts understandably want to show their media guests as much as possible.  However, in a recent survey conducted by S&R we found free time was a “must have” for all respondents.  This includes sufficient time between tours and meals for your guests to change and rest.

 

  • Internet access. Press trips are work trips. This means media reps need to work on stories and stay in touch with their office. It is imperative that guests have easy access to internet at all hours.  Hotel room internet access is preferred, but as some hotels begin to focus internet usage in common areas it is important that the setting is comfortable, and provides privacy if needed.

 

  •  Flexibility. Group visits should allow flexibility within reason. It is especially important to accommodate certain requests that are in reference to assigned story topics.

 

  • Hour by hour itineraries.  Everyone is different. Often journalists who have never visited a destination prefer more detailed itineraries, whereas journalists who are familiar prefer less structure. It is important to assign reasonable start and end times so the days are not too long.

There will always be imperfections during press trips, but when they are well organized they can generate great benefits. A couple of weeks ago we received a note from a  journalist for whom we arranged a media visit. He wrote “[the] trip was one of the best media trips I’ve been on, and I’ve been on quite a few! My hat is off to you… and everyone who helped. I was very pleased with all the arrangements, schedule, etc. Outstanding  trip.”  Our client benefited from two months of premium national exposure through the print and online circulation of this journalists article. The article’s message was consistent with the client’s communication strategy, and that is what defines a successful press trip.


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Elements of Successful Marketing Campaigns

I’d like to share some elements that have made marketing campaigns successful in our experience:

  • Effective communication and promotions that are attractive to the target audience. In addition to a new audience, the communication strategy should motivate contacts who have known about the company for over a year – but had not done business with the company – to finally respond to the call to action.
  • The strategy should take into account past strategies that worked as well as strategies that  may been good ideas originally – but weren’t implemented properly. They should be modified to fit into the objectives of the current campaign if it is thought they can meet the needs of the target market.
  • The campaign execution should include plenty of follow-up with  prospects along the way.
  • The strategy design and execution phases need to run their course without being rushed. Each phase should be implemented without cutting corners. Once the campaign ends, it is importante for the client’s staff to continue to engage the segments of brand new audiences who were not ready to act right away.